Tag: philadelphia

What Women Need

Women’s wage inequality is an issue that should not be on the rise.

Gender inequality in the work place is a sensitive issue that requires more attention from individuals and the media as a whole. Continue reading “What Women Need”

Buddhism’s Deep Morals

Buddhism, it is a religion that sprouted nearly over-night and is based on one man. This man was re-named: Buddha. Buddha was no different from any other man; except for he was “awake”.  Based on their beliefs and practices, Buddhism is a religion for people who do not need the comfort of a solid answer to the question, “what happens after we are dead?”, because Buddhists are in heaven on Earth. Continue reading “Buddhism’s Deep Morals”

I Don’t Want to Be Here Pt. I

It was hot as hell in the car on our way back to my mom’s apartment. Her cars never had air conditioning. We used “ghetto air-conditioning,” plastic water bottles between our legs.

We fell into our chairs in the living room, exhausted but ready to go.

“So…what to want to know about?” she asked slyly.

I told her I wanted to know about her experience being homeless as essentially a little girl.

Michelle had been living in Willingboro, NJ for only a few years before she became a homeless youth in the late 1970’s.

Michelle’s adolescence was tumultuous due to an incredibly drastic change in life style at such a young age. Continue reading “I Don’t Want to Be Here Pt. I”

How Does One Figure Out What to Do with Their Life?

I’ll start like this; I don’t know what I want, exactly. I don’t know what I feel either, at least not fully. Nevertheless, I am still going to try to explain myself.

When I think about what I envision for the rest of my life, what I have envisioned in the past, a plethora of things come to mind. A sea of dreams falls from the sky and drowns me. Continue reading “How Does One Figure Out What to Do with Their Life?”

“Don’t Worry, You Won’t Miss it”

I’ve been smoking cigarettes for about fourteen years. I always told myself, I’ll quit when I’m 18, 21, 22, 23, etcetera. You know how it goes.

I’m 26 years old now with chronic bronchitis, asthma, and re-occurring lung infections. I figured it was time to quit. I decided to try hypnotism for this.

Now, don’t judge me just yet, I am just as skeptical about hypnosis as the next guy, just more desperate.

Quitting cigarettes is not like quitting drugs. You cannot hide from cigarettes. You cannot delete convenience stores from your phone. You don’t cut-off your smoker friends. Your friends who smoke cigarettes aren’t robbing you or breaking the law. Continue reading ““Don’t Worry, You Won’t Miss it””

“Best Friends for Death”

I had been in the bathroom for quite a while at my parents after the party. “Are you alright?” my sister said so blithely. I had fallen into the bathtub fully clothed and replied, “I’m fine!” She opened the door and as I sat up, blood poured from my head, down my face and into my mouth.

You see, my Aunt Jippy throws good parties. It was her 50th birthday party that night, and I had a blast with my family just eating, drinking, and dancing to Frank Sinatra covers. Very atypical for me.

As soon as I got back to my apartment, I called my best friend, Gabrielle Thora Sweder. I left her a slurred yet detailed voicemail about my escapade of the night and compared it to one we had together in the past. Continue reading ““Best Friends for Death””

“Eighteen Months Face Down, Covered in Glass”

Eighteen Months Face Down, Covered in Glass

My mother, Michelle K. Robinson was born in April of 1960, six years after segregation in public schools was declared unconstitutional and a violation of the 14th amendment. In 1974, in South Boston Massachusetts, my mother survived the Boston Bus Riots, a postscript to Brown vs. Board of Education ruling.

The sky was grey on a Tuesday morning when I opened the side door to my parents’ apartment; it was left open for me. I was there to interview my mother.

As I slunk through the morning kitchen heavy with the scent of coffee and dishes, my mother warmly shushed from the other room, “I hear you over there.” I settled down in the living room, dropping my jacket and bags on the floor and sitting cross-legged on a big, pink, and welcoming floor pillow. With a cup of black coffee and the record button pressed down on the phone in my hands, we began.

“We were always afraid that they were going to tip the bus over, and the only thing that stopped us from being afraid of that was the fact they were lined up on both sides,” Michelle rolled her eyes, exhaled deeply and lit her cigarette.

The Boston Bus Riots phenomena was the retaliation of Irish South Boston Residents in response to the court ordered busing of students from predominantly white to predominantly Black Boston schools and vice versa. Federal District Court Judge W. Arthur Garrity put this in place during the summer of 1974. Continue reading ““Eighteen Months Face Down, Covered in Glass””

“I Just Want to See Alice Coopers Face”

Late in the night on a Thursday in Tennessee, the stars were clear and I was on the prowl. It was the summer of 2012 at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival when I fell in love.

It is about a 14 to 15-hour drive to Tennessee from Philadelphia. It is a long and arduous highway riddled ride.

However, there are not many distances young people won’t travel go for good music, food, drugs, and beer. Continue reading ““I Just Want to See Alice Coopers Face””

“Abraham on Christmas”

 

It was mid December in Philadelphia, and I was up early doing the last of my schoolwork before the end of the semester. Since it was just a couple weeks before Christmas I was waiting for miscellaneous packages from Amazon and the like when I heard the doorbell go off in my building. Continue reading ““Abraham on Christmas””